Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Getting closer? Differences remain in neuropsychological assessments converted to mobile devices.

Dementia is an increasing concern in today’s aging society. Despite the limited evidence for dementia screening at a population level, a push to improve diagnosis and the expansion of technology usage within health-care settings has led to the rising popularity of computerized neuropsychological assessment devices (CNADs). Some CNADs are completely new tests, others are direct translations of traditional pen-and-paper cognitive functioning tests. This study is an investigation of the equivalence between two existing pen-and-paper tests and their translated versions on mobile platforms. In this small-scale study (N = 42), the scores on two multidomain assessments—Saint Louis University Mental State Examination (SLUMS; Feliciano et al., 2013) and Cambridge University Pen to Digital Equivalence assessment (CUPDE; Ruggeri, Maguire, Andrews, Martin, & Menon, 2016)—were significantly different, even with multiple design iterations, when participants were matched by age and score on an independent screening tool, the Self-Administered Gerocognitive Exam (SAGE), t(13) = 2.55, p

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Behavioral and cognitive intervention strategies delivered via coached apps for depression: Pilot trial.

Depression is common in primary care settings, but barriers prevent many primary care patients from initiating treatment. Smartphone apps stand as a possible means to overcome such barriers. However, there is limited evidence to understand the use and efficacy of these apps. The purpose of the current study was to pilot an evaluation of the usage and efficacy of apps for depression based upon behavioral or cognitive intervention skills, compared to a wait-list control. Thirty adults with depression were randomized to the use of either a behavioral app (Boost Me) or a cognitive app (Thought Challenger) or to a wait-list control. Boost Me and Thought Challenger participants received 6 weeks of the respective intervention along with weekly coaching sessions, with a 4-week follow-up period; wait-list control participants received no interventions for 10 weeks. A repeated-measures analysis of variance was conducted to examine depression over time and across treatment groups; t tests compared app usage across groups. Depression scores changed significantly over time (p.05). The present study provides initial support that intervention strategies for depression delivered via apps with human support can impact symptoms and may promote continued use over 6 weeks. This pilot also demonstrates the feasibility of future research regarding the delivery of behavioral and cognitive intervention strategies via apps. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Relationship between traumatic brain injury history and recent suicidal ideation in Iraq/Afghanistan-era veterans.

This study evaluated whether a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) was associated with increased risk for recent suicidal ideation (SI) after accounting for demographics, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and sleep quality. In terms…

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Examining emotion relief motives as a facilitator of the transition from suicidal thought to first suicide attempt among active duty soldiers.

Cross-sectional and retrospective studies indicate that a primary motive for suicidal behavior among United States soldiers is the desire to alleviate or reduce emotional distress. This is also the aim of psychological services designed to prevent suic…

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Prospective associations between <em>DSM–5</em> PTSD symptom clusters and suicidal ideation in treatment-seeking veterans.

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) rates are higher in military veterans than in the civilian population. Meta-analyses have found strong and consistent associations between PTSD and suicide risk. Several studies have demonstrated a concurrent reduct…

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