Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Trajectories in postoperative recovery of elderly hip-fracture patients at risk for depression: A follow-up study.

Objectives: This secondary-analysis study aimed to identify distinct developmental depressive-symptom trajectories among elderly hip-fracture patients at risk for depression, examine the associations of trajectories with potential risk factors and care…

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Delivering problem-solving treatment in low-vision rehabilitation: A pilot feasibility study.

Purpose: To explore the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of Problem-Solving Treatment for Primary Care (PST-PC) delivered by low-vision rehabilitation (LVR) practitioners to adult clients with depressive symptoms. Design/Method: A single-group pre/postintervention study. Eighteen adult LVR clients with depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire–9 [PHQ-9] score of ≥5) received 6–8 weekly telephone sessions of PST-PC delivered by expertly trained practitioners (n = 14). Feasibility was determined via participating client and practitioner recruitment and intervention retention rates. Depressive symptoms (PHQ-9), health-related quality of life (HRQoL; Assessment of QoL Instrument–7D), and confidence in one’s ability to cope using problem-solving strategies (Coping Self-Efficacy Scale) were assessed using pre/posttelephone assessments. Results: Participating client recruitment and retention rates were 71% and 40%, respectively. Seventy percent of practitioners completed supervised training in PST-PC and demonstrated satisfactory levels of fidelity and competency. Postintervention, we observed a 53% improvement in depressive symptoms (p

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: A case-control study assessing parenting sense of competence in people with multiple sclerosis.

Objective: To assess the parenting sense of competence in mothers and fathers with MS compared to a matched group of healthy parents and to evaluate whether illness features, mood, coping and social support influence parenting sense of competence in mothers and fathers with MS. Method/Design: Participants in both groups were parents with at least 1 child under 18 years of age. They completed an anonymous online questionnaire of scales on parenting sense of competence, health-related quality of life, coping, depression and anxiety, and perceived social support. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate associations between parents with MS and study outcomes. Results: Eighty parents with MS and 80 healthy parents participated in the study. The mean age of the MS group was 41.5 years and 42.8 years in the control group. Both groups were 83.8% female and 16.7% male. A comparison between groups on parenting sense of competence did not highlight a significant difference. Higher scores on the 12-Item Short Form Health Survey, both physical (p p = .001) components, contributed to a higher score on the Parenting Sense of Competence scale in the MS group. Conclusions/Implications: Parents with MS in the current study maintained a sense of competence in their parenting role, similar to the healthy control group and quality of life correlated with parenting sense of competence. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved)

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Demographic, psychosocial, and health- and disability-related factors associated with psychological distress among people with physical disabilities.

Objectives: Psychological distress among people with physical disabilities (PWPD) might affect their physical morbidity, reduce their quality and duration of life, and increase their need for health care services. Therefore, it is essential to explore …

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Appraisals of DisAbility Primary and Secondary Scale—Short Form (ADAPSS?sf): Psychometrics and association with mental health among U.S. military veterans with spinal cord injury.

Objective: Cognitive appraisals, that is, interpretations of what is observed and the personal relevance attributed to those observations, affect one’s behavior and well-being. Despite the centrality of appraisals in the transactional model of stress a…

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Promoting resilience in individuals aging with multiple sclerosis: Results from a pilot randomized controlled trial.

Purpose/Objective: Starting in middle adulthood, individuals living with multiple sclerosis (MS) are confronted with the simultaneous challenge of coping with advancing MS alongside age-related changes. Psychological resilience is thought to play an im…

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Impact of frontal neurobehavioral symptoms on employment in individuals with TBI.

Objective: To explore the contribution of frontal systems behavioral dysfunction on employment outcomes in individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI), in the context of relevant predictors of work status. Method: Forty-two participants with history of moderate-to-severe TBI were classified as either “Employed” or “Unemployed.” Groups did not differ on most demographic or injury variables, although the Unemployed sample reported greater symptoms of depression, pain, and fatigue (ps ps > 0.05). T tests using neurobehavioral indicators of frontal dysfunction (i.e., FrSBe) revealed differences between groups on both self- (Hedge’s g = 0.71; p = .046) and informant-rated (g = 1.12; p = .001) FrSBe total T scores. Two logistic regressions for each FrSBe score were conducted, including relevant variables on which samples differed as covariates. Only the informant-rated FrSBe score remained a significant predictor of employment (FrSBe-informant: p = .038; R-squared change = 0.177). Self- and informant-rated FrSBe scores were significantly correlated in the Unemployed group (r = .403; p = .037) but not in the Employed sample (r = .102; p = .717). Conclusions: These results suggest that behavioral indicators of frontal systems dysfunction are predictive of employment status in individuals with TBI. Future work should aim to test the efficacy of strategies to reduce dysfunctional frontal behaviors as a means to gain and maintain employment. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved)

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Development of the Multiple Sclerosis Resiliency Scale (MSRS).

Objectives: While resilience has been an area of increasing research, there are no measures that are specific to the psychological, social, and physical factors associated with resilience in persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS). This study aimed to develop the MS Resiliency Scale (MSRS), a multidimensional measure. Items were created based on a review of the literature, with five hypothesized subscales, and then evaluated in a large sample of PwMS. Method: Participants (N = 932) were primarily recruited through the North American Research Committee on MS (NARCOMS) and completed the study electronically. Principal components analysis was utilized to determine the number of factors and whether they aligned with the theorized model. Results: Using an unforced solution with oblique (promax) rotation and Kaiser normalization, and suppressing items with coefficients below 0.4, 25 items were retained in five subscales that accounted for 42.75% of the variance: Emotional and Cognitive Strategies (13 items; α = .92), Physical Activity and Diet (3 items; α = .77), MS Peer Support (2 items; α = .82), Support from Family and Friends (5 items; α = .79), and Spirituality (2 items; α = .91). The total score was negatively correlated with depression, r = −.72, p r = −.56, p

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Social Participation and Navigation (SPAN) program for adolescents with acquired brain injury: Pilot findings.

Purpose/Objective: Our goal was to examine the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of an app-based coaching intervention (Social Participation and Navigation; SPAN) to help survivors of acquired brain injury attain social participation goals. Research…

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